Voting & Marriage – Social patterns in India

This pattern of voters expressing a liking for one leader but voting for another party was striking and consistent, and when I described it to a colleague in Delhi, he offered a uniquely Indian analogy: These people are saying they would ideally like to have a love marriage, but that they will probably settle for the spouse chosen by their parents.

Voters liking one leader but voting for another party seems to be a consistent pattern in UP, March 1, 2017 at 10:58AM

Anti-immigration <==> Don’t know many immigrants

The National Front has, in recent years, become more popular in many rural areas and small towns like Wizernes, places that are often relatively homogeneous and have few immigrants.

– Will France Sound the Death Knell for Social Democracy?, January 26, 2017 at 10:59AM

It’s the same here in the UK – many of the places that voted most heavily for Brexit, and are most anti-immigrant, are also the ones with very few immigrants.

I’m guessing it’s easier to whip up a fear of the unknown – immigrants people in, say villages of NE England, have never met – than of the known – immigrants people in London meet, work and play with every day.

Further down, in the same article… Lecoustre is anti-immigration, NF supporter, while Sailliot is anti-NF, leftist union leader.

I asked Lecoustre if immigration had changed his life in any direct way. He thought for a moment. “No,” he said.

Sailliot interjected. This was the absurdity of it all, he said. There were hardly any migrants in the area, and yet somehow, immigration was everybody’s biggest problem. How could that be?

Zersetzung, c. 2017

What Russia does today is very much the digital version of what we Germans, before 1989, termed “Zersetzung.”

… political equivalent of what happens when you pour acid on organic material: dissolution and disintegration.

Angela Merkel, Russia’s Next Target, January 11, 2017 at 03:32PM